ESTATE PLANNING ORANGE COUNTY, ORANGE COUNTY ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY, IRVINE ESTATE PLANNING, PROBATE LITIGATION,TRUST LITIGATION,Laguna Woods Estate Planning, Liesure World,
Wills, Probate Lawyer, AB Trusts, ABC Trusts, Trust Funding, Life Insurance Trusts, Business Succession, Gifting, Elderly Care, Hospice, Home Care, Nursing Home, Advanced Health Care Directive, Probate, Living Trust, Conseritorship, Adult Day Care, Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Retirement Planning, Business and Tax Planning, Special Needs Trusts, Life Insurance Trusts, Retirement Trusts, Simple Trusts, Charitable Gifts, Generation Skipping Planning, Marital Agreements, International Estate Planning, Elder Law, Conservatorships, Guardianships, Real Estate Inheritance, Aliso Viejo, Costa Mesa, Dana Point, Huntington Beach, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Newport Beach, Orange, Placentia, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Seal Beach, Tustin, Villa Park, Coto de Caza, Ladera Ranch

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ORANGE COUNTY
ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY
Trusts, Wills, Probate and Estate Planning
..

Free Initial Consultation - House Calls Upon Request
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9070 Irvine Center Drive, Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92618
Specializing in Trust and Probate Litigation, Trust / Probate Funding and Administration, Wills, Appointment of Guardianship for Children, Special Needs Planning, Incapacitation Planning, Advanced Health Care Directives
"There is comfort in taking care of your loved ones"
Call Us Today! (949)916-6020
Email: Begin@EstatePlanningOrangeCounty.com
 
Creating a Trust in Orange County, California
Orange County Wills Lawyers
Probate Administration
.
Advance Health Directive
.
Advanced Estate Planning
.
Business & Tax Planning
.

Business & Tax Planning

Business & Tax Planning

Business & Tax Planning

Frequently Asked Questions

Contact Us


Hello, I'm Tracy Murphy
and
Our Law Office is located
in Orange County
Irvine, California:

"We are close to the
5 freeway and Bake
Parkway."

Our Address is:

Tracy Murphy
Attorney At Law

(949)916-6020
9070 Irvine Center
Drive, Suite 100
Irvine, CA 92618

Fax: (949)861-6520

"For Driving Directions
Click Here"


Article 1: What is Probate in California?
Article 2: Most Frequently Asked Questions About Probate in California,
Article 3: Glossary of Probate Terms
Article 4: California Probate Code
Article 5: How To Hire A Good Attorney
Article 6: What is a Living Trust?
Article 7: What is an Advance Health Care Directive?
Article 8: What is a Conseritorship or Gardianship?
Article 9: About Elderly Care
Article 10: Assisted Living
Article 11: Adult Day Care
Article 12: Long Term Care for the Elderly
Article 13: Nursing Homes
Article 14: Home Care



Tracy Murphy is
a Law graduate of
Loyola Law School
in Los Angeles.






Attorney Tracy Murphy
was a Professor of
Estate Planning for the
University of Phoenix







Tracy Murphy is
a lawyer member of the
California Bar Association




LINKS:
About Orange County
California
Where the majority
of my clients are located

 

 

 

 

TRACY MURPHY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Specializes in:


Estate Planning

Trusts

Wills

Advanced Health
Care Directive

Probate Administration

Advanced
Estate Planning

Business Succession
and Tax Planning



Probate Administration

Probate Litigation

Real Estate Inheritance

Leisure World Estate Planning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assisting,
guiding,
securing and
protecting you
and your family
now and
for the future in:

ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY ORANGE COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY WILLS TRUSTS LAWYER

PROBATE ATTORNEY Southern California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ESTATE PLANNING ORANGE COUNTY, ORANGE COUNTY ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY, IRVINE ESTATE PLANNING, TRUST LITIGATION ATTORNEY, PROBATE LITIGATION ATTORNEY,, Laguna Woods Estate Planning, Liesure World, Wills, Probate Lawyer, AB Trusts, ABC Trusts, Trust Funding, Life Insurance Trusts, Business Succession, Gifting, Elderly Care, Hospice, Home Care, Nursing Home, Advanced Health Care Directive, Probate, Living Trust, Conseritorship, Adult Day Care, Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Retirement Planning, Business and Tax Planning, Special Needs Trusts, Life Insurance Trusts, Retirement Trusts, Simple Trusts, Charitable Gifts, Generation Skipping Planning, Marital Agreements, International Estate Planning, Elder Law, Conservatorships, Guardianships, Real Estate Inheritance, Aliso Viejo, Costa Mesa, Dana Point, Huntington Beach, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Newport Beach, Orange, Placentia, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Seal Beach, Tustin, Villa Park, Coto de Caza, Ladera Ranch

 

 

 

 

 





Probate, Trusts, Wills, and Estate Planning Attorney

Servicing Orange County, Irvine, Laguna Woods, Leisure World, Seal Beach, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Coto De Caza, San Clemente, Newport Beach, Huntington Beach

Orange County's friendly and caring estate planning law office. The Law Office of Tracy Murphy is located in the city of Irvine, in Orange County, California. Tracy Murphy represents individuals, families, and small business owners in estate planning, business planning, tax planning, trust litigation and probate litigation. Tracy Murphy is a knowledgeable estate planning attorney who understands the value of establishing trustworthy, long-term relationships with each client. Clients appreciate the availability of house calls and hospital visits at no additional cost.

Tracy Murphy, Attorney At Law sets the highest standards
in Custom Estate Planning, dedicated to today's needs and tomorrow's realities. Thorough and thoughtful evaluation of your needs guarantees the optimum solution for your circumstances - no matter how simple or complex.

Your attorney should be your advocate.
I will help you
plan one of the most important aspects of your future - your legacy. With information assembled in one-on-one meetings, we will personalize a trust that will put a legal frame to your needs and anchor your financial legacy. We also do Trust Litigation and Probate Litigation to protect you or help you from inadequate or irregular distributions of funds, mismanagement of trust assets, illegal disposal of trust assets, diversion of assets to the trustee, undue influence, and conflicts of interest in the management of the trust.

Together we will set objectives, address concerns and custom-build an Estate Plan tailored to reflect your needs, lifestyle and goals. Caring continuing attention to the administration of your estate offers comfort to loved ones and helps avoid unnecessary family hardship.

"I believe the most important estate planning objectives are protecting what you have earned, and planning to provide for your loved ones" - Tracy Murphy.

Call us today at: (949)916-6020


Legal Services:  
   
SERVICES WILLS & TRUSTS
Estate Planning: Wills, Trusts, Probate, Revocable Living Trusts (inter vivos trusts)
Special Needs Planning Last Will & Testament
Incapacitation Planning Special Needs Trusts (Disabled)
Buy Sell Agreements Pour-over Will
Marital Agreements Accumulation and Maintenance trusts
Domestic Partnership Agreements Living Wills (End of life choices)
Trust Transfer Documents Discretionary Trusts
Property Deeds and Affidavits Incentive Trusts
HIPAA Releases Codicils
Powers of Attorney IRA Trusts
Guardianships Life Insurance Trusts (ILIT)
Trust Administration Irrevocable Trusts
Small Business Planning Qualified Terminable Interest Trusts (Q-TIP)
Federal Estate Tax Planning A/B Trusts
Advance Directives ABC Trusts
Marital Property Agreements Credit Shelter Trusts
Durable Power of Attorney for Finances Bypass Trusts
Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care Exemption Trusts
Charitable Giving Disclaimer Trusts
  Testamentary Trusts
Charitable Trusts
PROBATE ADMINISTRATION
Settling any disputes
Collecting all probate property of the decedent
Paying all debts, claims and taxes owed by the estate
Collecting all rights to income, dividends, etc.
Distributing or transferring the remaining property to the heirs
   
   

TRUSTS

Estate Planning Attorney Orange County | Wills Trusts Lawyer Southern CaliforniaA trust is an agreement under which money or other assets are held and managed by one person for the benefit of another. Different types of trusts may be created to accomplish specific goals. Each kind may vary in the degree of flexibility and control it offers. Advantages of a trust is its ability to avoid Probate and to reduce or eliminate estate taxes.


Trusts are flexible documents and can allow you to:

Provide for and protect beneficiaries with poor spending habits;
Provide beneficiaries with incentive for education;
Provide for a current spouse and children, while securing inheritance for your children from a. ...........previous relationship;
Reduce the burden of Federal Estate Taxes to heirs;
Provide for disabled loved ones while preserving his or her eligibility for government benefits;
Restrict beneficiaries from cashing out an IRA, and require "stretch benefits" (continuation of ..........tax deferred plan with annual distributions).

For more information on Trusts and Living Trusts call us at (949)916-6020.


SPECIAL NEEDS PLANNING
An outright inheritance can disqualify a disabled individual from eligibility for government benefits. Special Needs Planning will protect a disabled individual's eligibility for government benefits, while providing for his or her ongoing needs.

WILLS
Last Will & Testament allows for the disposition of property to intended beneficiaries. A Pour-Over Will transfers assets held outside of a Trust into the Trust.

APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIANSHIP
The most important decision parents can make is who would raise their children in the event that the parents could not. If the parents do not make this decision, the State will. Without a nomination of guardian, family and friends may disagree about which would be the best guardian for the child or children. Such disputes result in high legal costs, family feuds that never heal and instability for the children.

Estate Planning Attorney Orange County | Wills Trusts Lawyer Southern CaliforniaPROBATE
Probate is the court proceeding in which the court either verifies a Will, or determines disposition of property according to State law for those who die without a Will or other estate plan. Real property not held in Trust or joint tenancy must go through probate before distribution to the heirs of the deceased owner. Money and assets exceeding $100,000 in value, that is not held in Trust, joint tenancy or covered by a beneficiary designation is also subject to probate. A simple probate lasts approximately 6 months. For more information on Probate Administration call us at (949)916-6020.

INCAPACITATION PLANNING
Incapacitation Planning allows self-determination regarding finances and health care decisions.

A Durable Power of Attorney allows a person to designate an agent or agents to handle financial matters, such as the payment of mortgages, utilities and medical bills in the event of incapacitation and circumvents appointment of a court appointed conservator.
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An Advance Health Care Directive allows a person to direct medical personnel regarding the continuation or withdrawal of artificial life sustaining machines and treatments, if desired, in the event of terminal illness or injury. This form also allows designation of an agent or agents to make health care decisions in the event of incapacitation.

Estate Planning Attorney Orange County | Wills Trusts Lawyer Southern CaliforniaBUY-SELL AGREEMENTS
A Buy-Sell Agreement is a lifetime contract protecting business owners in the event of retirement, disability or death. A buy-sell agreement also provides for the transfer of a business interest, such as in a corporation, partnership or limited liability company to surviving owners, while providing heirs with the cash value of the deceased owner's interest.

MARITAL AGREEMENTS
A Marital Agreement (Pre-Nuptial or Post-Nuptial) is an agreement made by a couple either before or after marriage that concerns financial issues such as control, possession, division and distribution of separately owned and jointly owned property and assets in the event of divorce or death. A martial agreement is an important planning tool, especially for couples with children from previous relationships.

DOMESTIC PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS
A Domestic Partnership Agreement is an agreement that explains the legal rights and responsibilities of each partner when a couple decides to form a long-term committed relationship, including same sex couples. A domestic partnership agreement addresses issues concerning separately owned and jointly owned property and assets.

Estate Planning Attorney Orange County | Wills Trusts Lawyer Southern CaliforniaTRUST TRANSFER DOCUMENTS
Trust transfer documents are needed to transfer your property into your Trust, such as real property deeds; corporate stock assignment; assignment of partnership interest; and transfer of sole proprietorship interest.


TRACY MURPHY carefully advises clients on estate planning matters. Whether you want to plan for a growing family, are starting a new business venture, or are in need of basic or advanced estate planning. You will receive personal attention and an efficient and effective estate planning, you will receive personal attention and an efficient and effective estate plan that helps you accomplish all of your goals.

Estate Planning Attorney Orange County | Wills Trusts Lawyer Southern CaliforniaCONTACT US AT: (949)916-6020
Our Orange County Estate Planning Law Practice

TRACY MURPHY, ATTORNEY AT LAW has helped countless clients throughout Orange County and surrounding areas with their estate planning needs. Clients receive the personalized attention and prompt service.
House Calls are also available upon request.

You can contact TRACY MURPHY at (949)916-6020, or send an e-mail to tracylaw@tracymurphy.com, to schedule a free initial consultation.
The Law Office of Tracy Murphy is located in Orange County, in the city of Irvine

The Address is: Tracy Murphy Attorney At Law 9070 Irvine Center Drive, Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92618
"For Driving Directions Click Here"

The estate planning law practice of TRACY MURPHY, ATTORNEY AT LAW serves all cities in Orange County, including: Irvine, Aliso Viejo, Laguna Niguel, Aliso Viejo, Mission Viejo, Coto de Caza, Lake Forest, Foothill Ranch, Rancho Santa Margarita, Laguna Hills, Laguna Woods, Leisure World, Laguna Beach, San Juan Capistrano, Capistrano Beach, San Clemente, Dana Point, Newport Beach, Corona Del Mar, Huntington Beach, Santa Ana, Seal Beach, Anaheim, Brea, Buena Park, Costa Mesa, Cypress, Fountain Valley, Fullerton, Garden Grove, La Habr,a Placentia, Tustin, Villa Park, Westminster, and Yorba Linda and more.

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ALL ABOUT TRUSTS:

A trust is an agreement under which money or other assets are held and managed by one person for the benefit of another. Different types of trusts may be created to accomplish specific goals. A trust can be used to reduce or eliminate estate taxes and avoid probate.

Trusts are flexible documents and can allow you to:

Provide for and protect beneficiaries with poor spending habits;
Provide beneficiaries with incentive for education;
Provide for a current spouse and children, while securing inheritance for your children from a. ...........previous relationship;
Reduce the burden of Federal Estate Taxes to heirs;
Provide for disabled loved ones while preserving his or her eligibility for government benefits;
Restrict beneficiaries from cashing out an IRA, and require "stretch benefits" (continuation of tax
.......... deferred plan with annual distributions).

Creating a Trust

Certain elements are necessary to create a legal trust, including a "Settlor" (also known as a "Grantor," "Trustor" or "Donor") Trustee, Beneficiary, Trust Property and Trust Agreement.

The person who provides property and creates a trust is called a Settlor.

The Trustee is the individual or institution that holds legal title to the trust property and is responsible for managing and administering those assets. In most cases, the Settlor (creator of the Trust) serves as the initial Trustee. It is also possible for two or more Trustees to serve together, or for both an individual and an organization to act as Co-Trustees. Separate Trustees may also be named to manage different parts of a trust estate.

The Beneficiary is the person who is to receive the benefits or advantages (such as income) of a Trust. In general, any person or organization can be a Trust beneficiary.

To be valid, a Trust must hold some property to be administered. The Trust Property may be any asset, such as stocks, real estate, cash, a business or insurance. In other words, either "real" or "personal" property may constitute Trust Property (which may also be called the "Trust Corpus," "Trust Res," "Trust Estate" or "Trust Principal"). Trust Property may also include some future interest or right to future ownership, such as the right to receive proceeds under a life-insurance policy when the insured dies.

Types of Trusts

There are many kinds of trusts. One common way to describe a trust is by its relationship to the Settlor's life. In this regard, trusts are generally classified as either living trusts ("inter vivos" trusts) or testamentary trusts.

Living Trusts are created during the life of the Settlor. Property held in a living trust is not subject to Probate (the court-supervised process to transfer property on death) and is not disclosed in the court record, thus maintaining the Settlor's privacy even after death.

A Settlor can use a Trust to provide for payment of a child's education, health and other needs without distributing the child's entire allocated share directly to him or her. Many Settlors prefer to have assets held in trust for the benefit of the beneficiary for a stated period of time in order to allow for the beneficiary to gain financial maturity. Trusts can be custom designed to meet the Settlor's particular objectives and concerns. For example, some Settlors choose to create "Incentive Trusts" for their children. An Incentive Trust can provide for distribution of allocated amounts to beneficiaries upon attaining a specified educational level or degree.

If the Living Trust is revocable, the Settlor reserves the right to change the terms and/ or beneficiaries at any time during the Settlor's lifetime. Upon the Settlors death, the terms of the Trust become irrevocable.

A Living Trust may also be Irrevocable. An Irrevocable Living Trust may not be altered or terminated by the Settlor once the agreement is signed. The purposes for creating an Irrevocable Living Trust may be to remove trust assets from the Settlor's taxable estate upon the Settlor's death.

A Testamentary Trust is created as part of a Last Will & Testament. A Testamentary Trust becomes effective upon the death of creator of the Will. The Will provides that part or all of the decedent's estate will go to a Trustee who is charged with administering the trust property and making distributions to designated beneficiaries according to the provisions of the Trust. Unlike a Living Trust (or inter vivos trust), the decedent's property must pass through probate prior to becoming subject to the terms of the Testamentary Trust.

Specific Trusts for Specific Purposes

Choosing the right type of Trust depends on your specific objectives. For example, Life Insurance Trusts, such as Business Insurance Trusts (which may be used to protect the "key men," proprietor or partners of a business), or Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts (ILIT) are usually intended to provide assistance for the continuation of a business or the payment of estate tax in larger estates without having the proceeds counted toward the value of your estate for estate tax purposes.

You may also wish to reduce or eliminate estate taxes and also provide part or all of your estate to one or more charitable organizations. There are numerous types of charitable trusts. For example, a Charitable Remainder Trust allows you to provide a stream of income for one or more non-charitable beneficiaries (such as your children) for a certain period of time, including for the beneficiary's lifetime. Upon the expiration of the specified term, or death of the beneficiary, the remaining assets are distributed to the charity or charities of your choice.

Choosing a Trustee

Usually, the trust Settlor (creator of a Living Trust) serves as the initial Trustee over the trust and the trust property. The Trust Agreement names one or more persons to serve as "Successor Trustee" upon the death or incapacitation of the Settlor(s). A Trustee, whether an individual or institution, is given broad powers over maintenance and investment. To ensure that these duties are properly carried out, the law requires the Trustee to act in accordance with the express terms of the Trust Agreement; to act impartially in administering the trust for the benefit of the trust beneficiaries; administer trust property with reasonable care and skill; and maintain complete accounts and records of trust property.

In selecting a Successor Trustee you should consider the potential appointees honesty, responsibility and competence, as well as availability and willingness to serve.

Taxes and Trusts

The use of a trust may help you achieve certain goals, such as reduction or elimination of taxes.

Today many many people create trusts from do it yourself forms which the ramifications of this now are overburdening the California court system with trust litigation cases. Many of these trust problems gone wrong can be eliminated with a properly written trust by a good attorney.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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ALL ABOUT WILLS

A Will (Last Will & Testament) is a legal document, drafted and executed in accordance with state law, which becomes irrevocable at your death. Assets and property disposed of through a Will are subject to Probate.

Perhaps the most important use of a Will is for the appointment of A GUARDIAN FOR YOUR MINOR CHILDREN. You may nominate a person or persons who will have the responsibility to care for your minor children if both parents die before the child turns 18. Guardians are appointed in your Will. If you do not choose for yourself, the Court will choose for you.

IF YOU DIE WITHOUT A WILL OR OTHER ESTATE PLAN (known as dying "intestate"), California law will determine the beneficiaries of your estate. If you are married, your spouse receives all of your community property. Your spouse will receive part of your separate property, and the rest of your separate property will be distributed to your children or grandchildren, parents, sisters, brothers, nieces, nephews or other close relatives.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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Advance Health Care Directive: What's Important to You

An "Advance Health Care Directive" lets your physician, family and friends know your health care preferences, including the types of special treatment you want or don't want at the end of life, your desire for diagnostic testing, surgical procedures, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and organ donation.

By considering your options early, you can ensure the quality of life that is important to you and avoid having your family "guess" your wishes or having to make critical medical care decisions for you under stress or in emotional turmoil.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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Advanced Estate Planning

Tax Issues

Advanced estate planning focuses primarily on reducing transfer taxes. Under current federal law, there are three taxes that are imposed on the transfer of assets: the gift tax, the estate tax, and the generation-skipping transfer tax ("GSTT"). In addition to the transfer taxes that may apply, income tax can also reduce transfers. The gift tax applies to transfers made during life, the estate tax applies to transfers at death, and the generation-skipping transfer tax applies to transfers during life or at death that skip the children's generation and pass to "skip persons", who are generally grandchildren and those in lower generations.

Applicable Exclusion: The "applicable exclusion" (amount that may transfer tax free) for the federal gift and estate taxes is scheduled to increase in steps as follows:

  • Year

    “Applicable Exclusion Amount”

    Lowest Gift Tax Rate (after exclusion)

    Lowest Estate Tax Rate (after exclusion)

    Highest Tax Rate

    Gift Tax

    Estate Tax

    2001

    $675,000

    $675,000

    39%

    39%

    55%

    2002

    $1,000,000

    $1,000,000

    41%

    41%

    50%

    2003

    $1,000,000

    $1,000,000

    41%

    41%

    49%

    2004

    $1,000,000

    $1,500,000

    41%

    45%

    48%

    2005

    $1,000,000

    $1,500,000

    41%

    45%

    47%

    2006

    $1,000,000

    $2,000,000

    41%

    45%

    46%

    2007

    $1,000,000

    $2,000,000

    41%

    45%

    45%

    2008

    $1,000,000

    $2,000,000

    41%

    45%

    45%

    2009

    $1,000,000

    $3,500,000

    41%

    45%

    45%

    2010

    $1,000,000

    41%

    unlimited

    0%

    0%

    2011

    $1,000,000

    $1,000,000

    41%

    41%

    55%


    NOTE: This table reflects the current law, but it is anticipated that this will change before it becomes fully effective. If not changed, the 2001 tax act is automatically repealed for 2011 and after.

Revocable Trusts can be structured to reduce or eliminate transfer taxes, especially for married couples.

Bypass Trust / Credit Shelter Trusts/ AB Trusts / ABC Trusts / Exemption Trusts / Disclaimer Trusts
This type of trust begins as a single Revocable Trust. When the first of the Settlors dies, the Trust is divided into sub-trusts.

For example, an AB Trust divides into the "Survivor's Trust" and the "Decedent's Trust" (or "Credit Shelter Trust"). The Survivor's Trust remains revocable and contains the surviving Settlor's property interest. The Survivor has complete control over the property and can change the ultimate beneficiaries at any time. The Decedent's Trust contains the deceased Settlor's assets that can pass tax free. For example, for a Settlor dying in 2008, the Decedent's trust could contain up to $2,000,000 worth of the Decedent's assets (including the deceased Settlor's interest in the joint assets). The income and principal from the assets in the Decedent's trust may be distributed to the surviving Settlor, however the surviving Settlor may not change the ultimate beneficiaries of the Decedent's Trust, nor can the surviving Settlor revoke the Decedent's Trust. There are two main purposes for the creation of an AB type of Trust. The first is to ensure that upon the death of both Settlors, the maximum amount of assets and property can pass tax free to the final beneficiaries.

To illustrate, assume a married couple creates a Bypass Trust. The husband dies in 2007, at which time the total value of the estate is $4,000,000 (and the exclusion amount is $2,000,000). Upon the husband's death, the surviving wife creates the Survivor's Trust with her $2,000,000 interest in the estate and the Decedent's Trust with the deceased husband's $2,000,000 interest in the estate. The wife dies in 2008. Given the $2,000,000 estate tax exemption for 2007 and 2008, the couple's entire estate of $4,000,000 can pass estate tax free to their children. If however, the couple did not create a bypass trust, only $2,000,000 of the total estate could have passed to the couple's children without any estate tax. The other $2,000,000 would be subject to Federal Estate Tax.

The second main purpose for the creation of an AB type of trust is for the protection of future beneficiaries, in most circumstances, children from a prior marriage. While the surviving Settlor can dispose of his or her assets however he or she wishes, the surviving Settlor can not change the ultimate beneficiaries of the deceased Settlor's Trust. For example, the surviving step-father can not "disinherit" his deceased wife's children or prevent them from ultimately inheriting from their mother's share of the estate.

A/B/C Trusts

Nontax Issues

A proper estate plan can accomplish most of your non-tax objectives. First, you want to make sure that your assets are administered and distributed as you desire. Second, you want to minimize the expenses and complications that can come with the administration of your estate.

For example, a properly drafted living trust not only eliminates the need for Probate (and the fees, costs and delays associated with Probate) and provides for distribution of your assets upon death, but provides for your own care and benefit during any periods of incapacity, without the need for Court conservatorship proceedings.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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Business Succession Planning, Tax Planning and Estate Planning

Business Succession Planning assists clients in planning for the transition of ownership and control of family-owned businesses to their heirs. Without proper tax and estate planning heirs of a family business can often be forced to sell the business.

Business Succession Planning is among the most important -- and perhaps most difficult -- issues facing family-owned businesses. Studies show that more than 50% of such businesses lack business succession plans, and more than 70% of those will not survive the next generation. Simply stated, choosing a successor is an enormous decision. Business succession planning services can be of great assistance with this process, and many others that will ensure the efficacy and the sustainability of a business in the future.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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Probate Administration

THE CALIFORNIA PROBATE PROCESS
Probate courts oversee the administration of property after death. When someone dies in California, with or without a will, the passing of one's property needs to be managed. Probate is the processes of court supervision over the transfer of legal title of personal and/or real property from the estate of the person who has died (the "decedent") to his or her relatives, heirs, or beneficiaries.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ'S) ABOUT ESTATE PLANNING:

What is estate planning?

Estate planning is a process. It involves other people, such as your family, other individuals and, in many cases, charitable organizations of your choice. It also involves your assets (your property) and the various forms of ownership and title that those assets may take. And it addresses your future needs in case you ever become unable to care for yourself.

Through estate planning, you can determine:

  • How and by whom your assets will be managed for your benefit during your lifetime if you ever become unable to manage them yourself.
  • When and under what circumstances it makes sense to distribute your assets during your lifetime.
  • How and to whom your assets will be distributed after your death.
  • How and by whom your personal care will be managed and how health care decisions will be made during your lifetime if you become unable to care for yourself.

Many people mistakenly think that estate planning only involves the writing of a will. Estate planning, however, can also involve financial, tax, medical and business planning. A will is part of the planning process, but you will need other documents as well to fully address your estate planning needs.

What can I accomplish with an estate plan?

Through estate planning, you can determine:

  • How and by whom your assets will be managed for your benefit during your lifetime if you ever become unable to manage them yourself.
  • When and under what circumstances it makes sense to distribute your assets during your lifetime.
  • How and to whom your assets will be distributed after your death.
  • How and by whom your personal care will be managed and how health care decisions will be made during your lifetime if you become unable to care for yourself.

Many people mistakenly think that estate planning applies only to individuals with a large net worth. However a proper estate plan is not only important for those with large wealth, but for those with moderate and smaller estates. An estate plan ensures what you do have passes to those you intend, in the way you intend while incurring the least amount of expense possible.

Who needs estate planning?

Everyone, whether their estate is large, moderate or small. Either way, you should designate someone to manage your assets and make health care and personal care decisions for you if you ever become unable to do so for yourself.

If your estate is small, you may simply focus on who will receive your assets after your death, and who should manage your estate, pay your last debts and handle the distribution of your assets.

If your estate is large, your plan can focus on preserving your assets for your beneficiaries and reducing or eliminating the amount of estate tax which otherwise might be payable after your death.

What is included in my estate?

All of your assets. This could include assets held in your name alone or jointly with others, assets such as bank accounts, real estate, stocks and bonds, and furniture, cars and jewelry.

Your assets include life insurance proceeds, retirement accounts and payments that are due to you (such as a tax refund, outstanding loan or inheritance).

The value of your estate is equal to the fair market value of all of your various types of property after you have deducted your debts (your car loan, for example, and any mortgage on your home.)

The value of your estate is important in determining whether your estate will be subject to estate taxes after your death. Ensuring that there will be sufficient resources to pay such taxes is another important part of the estate planning process.

What is probate?

The process by which the provisions in your Last Will & Testament are carried out following your death is known as "Probate."

Probate is the court-supervised process developed under California law which has as its goal the transfer of your assets at your death to the beneficiaries set forth in your will, and in the manner prescribed by your Will, or if no Will then by State law.

The Probate court is accustomed to resolving disputes about the distribution of your assets in accordance with defined rules. However, Probate is public in nature, meaning that the provisions of your Will and the value of your assets become public record. Also, because lawyer's fees and executor's commissions are based upon a statutory fee schedule, the expenses may be greater than the expenses incurred by a comparable estate managed and distributed under a living trust. Time can also be a factor; often distributions to beneficiaries can be made pursuant to a living trust more quickly than in a probate proceeding.

Can I Change My Trust in the Future?

Yes. You should review your estate plan periodically because, if it is not up to date when you die, your estate may not be distributed as you wish.

Your trust can be changed by a simple amendment. Your Will can be changed through a "codicil" which is an amendment to your Will.

Your Trust or Will must not be changed by crossing out words or sentences or making any notes or written corrections on it. You should seek the advice of a lawyer when you marry or divorce. You should also review your Trust when there are any major changes in your family (such as births and deaths), when the value of your assets significantly increases or decreases, and when it is no longer appropriate for the persons named as Trustee, guardian or executor to act in that capacity.

Can I name alternative beneficiaries?

Yes. You should consider alternative beneficiaries in the event that your primary beneficiary does not survive you.

Who should be my executor or trustee?

That is your decision. You could name your spouse, choose an adult child, another relative, a family friend, a business associate or a professional fiduciary such as a bank. Your trustee does not need any special training. What is most important is that your chosen executor or trustee is organized, prudent, responsible and honest.

The Trustee of your living trust may assume responsibilities under the trust agreement while you are still living (if you ever become unable or unwilling to continue serving as trustee yourself).

Discuss your choice of trustee with your estate planning lawyer. There are many issues to consider. For example, will the appointment of one of your adult children hurt his or her relationship with any other siblings? And will the person named as Successor Trustee have the time, organizational ability and experience to do the job effectively?

How should I provide for my minor children?

Most important is to nominate a guardian or guardians to raise your child or children until he or she is 18 years old. This nomination is made in your Last Will & Testament.

Your nomination of a guardian could avoid a tug of war between well-meaning family members and others.

You should also consider setting up a Trust to be held, administered and distributed for the child or children's benefit at the age of your choosing. A Trust can be set up no matter how large or small your estate. For example, many individuals set up Trusts using only life insurance as the Trust Property.

When does estate planning involve tax planning?

Estate taxes are imposed upon estates that have a net value of $2 million or more. That amount will increase to $3.5 million in 2009. In 2010, the estate tax will disappear completely.

Then, unless Congress passes an extension, the exemption will revert back to $1 million in 2011. For estates that approach or exceed these amounts, significant estate taxes can be saved by proper estate planning.

What happens if I become unable to care for myself?

You can help determine what will happen by making your own arrangements in advance. Through estate planning, you can choose those who will care for you and your estate if you ever become unable to do so for yourself.

If you have not made any such arrangements in advance and you become unable to make sound decisions or care for yourself, a court could appoint a court-supervised conservator to manage your affairs and be responsible for your care.

Who Should Know About My Trust?

Other than your lawyer, no one needs to know what your Trust says. But the location of your original documents should be known by your Trustee and other close friends or relatives.

Will My Beneficiaries Have to Pay Estate Taxes?

Assets that are transferred to either your spouse (if he or she is a US citizen) or to charitable organizations are not subject to estate taxes. Assets passing to other individuals will be taxed if the net value of those assets exceed $2,000,000 for 2008 (See Applicable Exclusion Chart above). For estates which approach or exceed this value, significant estate taxes can be saved by proper estate planning. That planning must usually be accomplished before death and, in the case of married couples, before the death of the first spouse.

What Other Planning Should I Do?

DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY FOR PROPERTY MANAGEMENT. In this document you appoint another individual (the "attorney-in-fact") to make property management decisions on your behalf if you are incapacitated. The attorney-in-fact manages your assets and must do so in a prudent manner accountable to you and solely in your best interests.

DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY FOR HEALTH CARE ("Advance Health Care Directive"). This document allows the appointed person or persons to make health care decisions for you when you can no longer make them for yourself. It may also contain statements of wishes concerning such matters as life sustaining treatment and other health care issues, and instructions concerning organ donation.

By considering your options early, you can ensure the quality of life that is important to you and avoid having your family "guess" your wishes or having to make critical medical care decisions for you under stress or in emotional turmoil.

Can I create my own estate planning documents?

Yes. It is possible for a person to do his or her own estate planning with forms or books obtained at a stationery store or bookstore. However, keep in mind that Trusts, Wills and related documents are legal documents and can have serious legal and tax ramifications if not completed properly.

For more information call us at (949)916-6020.

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Estate Planning Glossary

Annual exclusion - Each individual can give away up to $11,000 per recipient per year without gift taxes. Not all gifts qualify for the annual exclusion; only outright gifts or gifts to certain types of trusts qualify.

Beneficiary - An individual(s) or institution(s) who is to receive real or personal property from a trust upon the terms set forth in the instrument or declaration of trust.

Charitable lead annuity trust ("CLAT") - A trust under which the charitable beneficiary has the right to receive an annuity amount each year during a stated term. The annuity amount is calculated based upon the initial value of the trust assets at the creation of the trust. After the stated term, the remainder of the trust is distributed to the non-charitable beneficiary.

Charitable lead trust - A trust under which a non-charitable beneficiary receives the remainder of the trust after payment of amounts over time to a charitable beneficiary. Often used to facilitate diversification of single low-basis stock holdings, and to maximize charitable gifts and deductions while providing income payments to the grantor.

Charitable lead unitrust trusts ("CLUT") - A trust under which the charitable beneficiary has the right to receive an annuity amount each year during a stated term. The annuity amount is calculated based upon the value of the trust assets at the beginning of each year of the trust. After the stated term, the remainder of the trust is distributed to the non-charitable beneficiary.

Charitable remainder annuity trust ("CRAT") - A trust under which the non-charitable beneficiary has the right to receive an annuity amount each year during a stated term or the beneficiary's lifetime. The annuity amount is calculated based upon the initial value of the trust assets at the creation of the trust. After the stated term or the beneficiary's lifetime, the remainder of the trust is distributed to the charitable beneficiary.

Charitable remainder trust - A trust under which a charitable beneficiary receives the remainder of the trust after payment of amounts over time to a non-charitable beneficiary. Often used to facilitate diversification of single low-basis stock holdings, and to maximize charitable gifts and deductions, while providing income payments to the grantor.

Charitable remainder unitrust trust ("CRUT") - A trust under which the non-charitable beneficiary has the right to receive an annuity amount each year during a stated term or the beneficiary's lifetime. The annuity amount is calculated based upon the value of the trust assets at the beginning of each year of the trust. After the stated term or the beneficiary's lifetime, the remainder of the trust is distributed to the charitable beneficiary.

Disclaimer - A refusal by an individual, usually in the form of a written document, to accept some or all of his or her legal rights to property. A disclaimer qualified under the Internal Revenue Code as a non-taxable transfer must be accomplished within 9 months after the date of the transfer.

Estate tax - A transfer tax imposed at a rate equal to 18% to 50% on transfers occurring at the decedent's death. Each decedent has a unified credit exemption of $1,000,000 (in 2003, $1,500,000 in 2004) from the tax, unless such exemption is used to exempt gifts made during lifetime.

Generation skipping transfer tax - A transfer tax imposed at a rate equal to the highest estate tax rate (currently 50%) on gifts or estate transfers where the transferred assets pass, or will pass, to recipients two or more generations below the donor, without being subject to the imposition of estate tax at the intervening generations. Each donor has an exemption of $1,120,000 (in 2003, $1,500,000 in 2004) from the tax.

Generation skipping trust - An inter vivos or testamentary trust designed to exist for more than one generation into the future and qualify for the generation skipping transfer tax exemption (equal to $1,120,000 in 2003 and $1,500,000 in 2004), while avoiding inclusion in the estates of the beneficiaries for estate tax purposes.

Gift tax - A transfer tax imposed at a rate equal to 18% to 50% on transfers made by a donor during their lifetime. Each decedent has a federal unified credit exemption ($1,000,000 in 2003, and $1,500,000 in 2004) from the federal gift tax, and, if not used during lifetime, the exemption will exempt transfers at death from the federal estate tax. Also, each donor can make an unlimited number of annual exclusion gifts each year without incurring gift tax.

Gift trust - Any trust that is intended to hold gifted or inherited assets for the benefit of individuals or institutional beneficiaries. Often created for beneficiaries who are unable to manage gifted assets, or to minimize gift, estate and generation skipping transfer taxes to the grantor and the beneficiaries.

Grantor - An individual(s) or institution(s) who transfers real or personal property in trust to a trustee or trustees under directions to the trustee, usually contained in a written trust instrument or agreement, to hold, manage, invest, account for and distribute the property to the beneficiary or beneficiaries on the terms set forth in the trust instrument.

Grantor retained annuity trust ("GRAT") - An irrevocable inter vivos trust under which a grantor transfers his or her interest in real or personal property to the trustee to hold during a specified term. During each year of the term, the grantor receives an annuity amount based upon the value of the assets at the creation of the trust. Upon expiration of the term, the trust property passes to the remainder beneficiary or beneficiaries. Primarily used to gift property to the remainder beneficiary that is susceptible to application of valuation discounts and actuarial discounts based on the grantor's age and the term of the trust, and is most beneficial if the property is expected to appreciate in value.

Grantor retained unitrust trust ("GRUT") - An irrevocable inter vivos trust under which a grantor transfers his or her interest in real or personal property to the trustee to hold during a specified term. During each year of the term, the grantor receives an annuity amount based upon the value of the assets at the beginning of the year. Upon expiration of the term, the trust property passes to the remainder beneficiary or beneficiaries. Primarily used to gift property to a remainder beneficiary that is susceptible to application of valuation discounts and actuarial discounts based on the grantor's age and the term of the trust, and is most beneficial if the property is expected to appreciate in value.

Intentionally defective grantor trust - An irrevocable inter vivos trust created by a grantor for the benefit of beneficiaries other than the grantor that attributes all income tax incidents to the grantor. Typically used where the grantor desires to irrevocably gift the property to the beneficiaries and exclude the property from the grantor's taxable estate for estate tax purposes, but intends that the transfer be ignored for income tax purposes. Often used in conjunction with a sale of discounted assets by the grantor to the trust, to avoid capital gain on the sale of the assets.

Inter vivos trust - A trust created during the grantor's lifetime, usually by means of a trust instrument or agreement.

Irrevocable Trust - A trust that is not amendable or revocable by the grantor. Can be created during a grantor's lifetime, often called an "inter vivos" trust, or upon a grantor's death, often called a "testamentary" trust. Some common types of irrevocable inter vivos trusts include life insurance trusts, gift trusts, generation skipping trusts, qualified personal residence trusts ("QPRT"), grantor retained annuity trusts ("GRAT"), intentionally defective grantor trusts, charitable remainder annuity trusts and charitable remainder unitrust trusts ("CRAT") and "CRUT"), charitable lead annuity trusts and charitable lead unitrust trusts ("CLAT" and "CLUT"). Some common types of testamentary trusts include, unified credit exemption trusts, marital trusts, generation skipping trusts, testamentary charitable remainder trusts and charitable lead trusts.

Life insurance trust - An irrevocable trust designed to hold life insurance policies on the life of the grantor to exclude those policies from the grantor's taxable estate for estate tax purposes. Typically includes provisions for rights of withdrawal by beneficiaries to qualify premium payments as annual exclusion gifts, as well as provisions for continuing testamentary trusts after the grantor's death for the grantor's spouse, children and other beneficiaries.

Limited partnership - A limited partnership is a partnership created under the limited partnership laws of each state. A limited partnership has both general partners and limited partners. The limited partners do not participate in the management of the partnership and, thus, are not subject to the claims of the creditors of the limited partnership. On the other hand, the general partners of a limited partnership are subject to the claims of the creditors of the limited partnership. The general partners generally have the ability to control the operations of the partnership, as well as the amount, if any, of any distributions to the limited partners. In addition, partnership agreements often restrict the ability of a limited partner to sell or otherwise transfer his or her interest in the limited partnership.

Marital deduction - An unlimited deduction against the estate tax and gift tax for transfers made outright or in qualifying trusts to the spouse of the transferor.

Marital deduction trust - A trust that qualifies for the marital deduction for estate tax and gift tax purposes. Several types of trusts so qualify, including: general power of appointment marital trusts, qualified terminable interest property trusts, and qualified domestic trusts.

Non-profit corporation - A corporation created under applicable state law, which is exempt from income taxes and is required to operate in accordance with applicable state law and tax laws. Typically, the board of directors or trustees consist of family members, making it appealing to donors who desire to control the gifted assets until they are distributed to charity.

Personal Representative - The individuals (or institutions) named in a will or appointed by the Probate Court who are responsible for gathering a decedent's assets, paying debts, taxes, and expenses, selling assets of the estate, if necessary, and distributing the remaining property and money according to the terms of the will (or the intestate laws of the state of residence). The personal representative must preserve and protect the estate assets and account to the estate beneficiaries for estate income and expenses. The personal representative must file a federal and state estate tax return, if required, and must also file final state and federal income tax returns for the decedent, and, if necessary, federal and state income tax returns for the estate.

Postnuptial agreements - Contracts entered into by a husband and wife after marriage, defining the rights of each spouse in their marital, non-marital and jointly-owned property in the event of divorce, legal separation or the death of one of the parties. A postnuptial contract is considered to be valid and enforceable if it complies with the statutory requirements for prenuptial agreements. Though historically not utilized as widely as prenuptial agreements, a recent modification of the Minnesota statues makes it likely that postnuptial agreements will become a more commonly used contract.

Prenuptial (Antenuptial) agreements - Contracts couples can enter into prior to marriage in order to govern their respective rights in marital, non-marital, and jointly-owned property in the event of divorce, legal separation, or the death of one of the parties. Minnesota law provides that a man and woman of legal age may enter into an agreement prior to solemnization of marriage that will be valid and enforceable if: (1) there is a full and fair disclosure of the earnings and property of each party; and (2) the parties have had an opportunity to consult with legal counsel of their own choice. Antenuptial agreements must be in writing, executed and acknowledged by the parties in the presence of two witnesses and a notary public, and must be entered into and executed prior to the day of solemnization of marriage.

Private foundation - A trust or nonprofit corporation that provides for distributions only to charitable recipients during its term. May be a perpetual trust or corporation.

Probate - A legal process whereby (1) a judge determines whether or not the decedent's will is valid; (2) a personal representative is appointed to (a) collect the decedent's assets in his or her probate estate, (b) pay the decedent's legal debts, and (c) distribute the remaining assets in the decedent's probate estate to the individuals or entities entitled to the assets in accordance with the will or laws of intestacy; and (3) the court approves the transfer of the decedent's assets to the individuals and entities designated in the will or the laws of intestacy. The probate court will also determine the rights, if any, of a spouse and children to the decedent's property.

Probate estate - The assets of the decedent as of the date of death which are titled only in the decedent's name, or which are payable to the decedent's "estate" or personal representative. Property held in joint tenancy with rights of survivorship are not included in the decedent's probate estate. In addition, the proceeds of life insurance, annuities, IRAs or qualified retirement benefits will not be included in the decedent's estate unless the beneficiary designation specifically designates the decedent's estate.

Qualified personal residence trust ("QPRT") - An inter vivos trust under which a grantor transfers his/her interest in a personal residence to the trustee to hold for the grantor's use and occupation during a specified term, and, upon expiration of the term, the residence passes to the remainder beneficiary or beneficiaries. Primarily used to gift the residence to the remainder beneficiary that is susceptible to application of valuation discounts and actuarial discounts based on the grantor's age and the term of the trust, and is most beneficial if the residence is expected to appreciate in value.

Revocable Trust - An inter vivos trust that is subject to amendment or revocation by the grantor or settlor. Primarily used to avoid probate upon the grantor's death, guardianship and conservatorship actions during the grantor's lifetime, and to maintain the grantor's privacy both during the grantor's lifetime and upon the grantor's death. Usually contains the same provisions as a will for the disposition of the grantor's estate upon the grantor's death.

Settlor - See grantor.

Testamentary trust - A trust created upon or after the grantor's death, often by means of a will or revocable trust, or in the context of another trust instrument or agreement.

Trust - A legal arrangement under which a grantor or settlor transfers real or personal property to a trustee or trustees under directions to the trustee, usually contained in a written trust instrument or agreement, to hold, manage, invest, account for and distribute the property to the beneficiary or beneficiaries on the terms set forth in the trust instrument.

Trustee - An individual or institution who is charged by the grantor or settlor with holding, managing, investing, accounting for and distributing property from a trust to the beneficiary or beneficiaries

Unified credit exemption - An amount of assets that can pass without imposition of an estate tax or gift tax on the transfer. The amount of assets equates to a credit against the estate tax or gift tax. In 2003, the federal estate and gift tax exemption is $1,000,000. In 2004 through 2006, the federal estate tax exemption increases to $1,500,000, and is scheduled to increase until 2010; the federal gift tax exemption is scheduled to remain at $1,000,000. Minnesota's exemption is $700,000.

Will - A written document by which a person who is over the age of eighteen (18) may direct, subject to certain exceptions, the disposition of their personal and real property after death. With a will, the decedent can name a personal representative and control the disposition of his or her probate estate subject to certain exceptions. If a person does not execute a will, each state has "default" rules, called "intestacy laws," which specify who receives the decedent's property upon his or her death.In addition, a will is the only method for legally naming a guardian for the decedent's children.Wills can provide for outright dispositions or use testamentary trusts. A will cannot dispose of property that is owned jointly with right of survivorship, or property that has a beneficiary designation, such as life insurance, annuities, IRAs.

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ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY WHERE THE MAJORITY OF OUR CLIENTS ARE:

Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. Its county seat is Santa Ana. According to the 2000 Census, its population was 2,846,289, making it the second most populous county in the state of California, and the fifth most populous in the United States. The state of California estimates its population as of 2007 to be 3,098,121 people, dropping its rank to third, behind San Diego County. Thirty-four incorporated cities are located in Orange County; the newest is Aliso Viejo.

Unlike many other large centers of population in the United States, Orange County uses its county name as its source of identification whereas other places in the country are identified by the large city that is closest to them. This is because there is no defined center to Orange County like there is in other areas which have one distinct large city. Five Orange County cities have populations exceeding 170,000 while no cities in the county have populations surpassing 360,000. Seven of these cities are among the 200 largest cities in the United States.

Orange County is also famous as a tourist destination, as the county is home to such attractions as Disneyland and Knott's Berry Farm, as well as sandy beaches for swimming and surfing, yacht harbors for sailing and pleasure boating, and extensive area devoted to parks and open space for golf, tennis, hiking, kayaking, cycling, skateboarding, and other outdoor recreation. It is at the center of Southern California's Tech Coast, with Irvine being the primary business hub.

The average price of a home in Orange County is $541,000. Orange County is the home of a vast number of major industries and service organizations. As an integral part of the second largest market in America, this highly diversified region has become a Mecca for talented individuals in virtually every field imaginable. Indeed the colorful pageant of human history continues to unfold here; for perhaps in no other place on earth is there an environment more conducive to innovative thinking, creativity and growth than this exciting, sun bathed valley stretching between the mountains and the sea in Orange County.

Orange County was Created March 11 1889, from part of Los Angeles County, and, according to tradition, so named because of the flourishing orange culture. Orange, however, was and is a commonplace name in the United States, used originally in honor of the Prince of Orange, son-in-law of King George II of England.

Incorporated: March 11, 1889
Legislative Districts:
* Congressional: 38th-40th, 42nd & 43
* California Senate: 31st-33rd, 35th & 37
* California Assembly: 58th, 64th, 67th, 69th, 72nd & 74

County Seat: Santa Ana
County Information:
Robert E. Thomas Hall of Administration
10 Civic Center Plaza, 3rd Floor, Santa Ana 92701
Telephone: (714)834-2345 Fax: (714)834-3098
County Government Website: http://www.oc.ca.gov

CITIES OF ORANGE COUNTY CALIFORNIA:


City of Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698
City of Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899
City of Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823
City of Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624
City of Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628
City of Cypress, 90630
City of Dana Point, 92624, 92629
City of Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728
City of Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838
City of Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846
City of Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649
City of Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710
City of La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633
City of La Palma, 90623
City of Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698
City of Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656
City of Laguna Niguel
, 92607, 92677
City of Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654
City of Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610
City of Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721
City of Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694
City of Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663
City of Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869
City of Placentia, 92870, 92871
City of Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679
City of San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674
City of San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694
City of Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799
City of Seal Beach, 90740
City of Stanton, 90680
City of Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782
City of Villa Park, 92861, 92867
City of Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685
City of Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887

Noteworthy communities Some of the communities that exist within city limits are listed below: * Anaheim Hills, Anaheim * Balboa Island, Newport Beach * Corona del Mar, Newport Beach * Crystal Cove/Pelican Hill, Newport Beach * Capistrano Beach, Dana Point * El Modena, Orange * French Park, Santa Ana * Floral Park, Santa Ana * Foothill Ranch, Lake Forest * Monarch Beach, Dana Point * Nellie Gail, Laguna Hills * Northwood, Irvine * Woodbridge, Irvine * Newport Coast, Newport Beach * Olive, Orange * Portola Hills, Lake Forest * San Joaquin Hills, Laguna Niguel * San Joaquin Hills, Newport Beach * Santa Ana Heights, Newport Beach * Tustin Ranch, Tustin * Talega, San Clemente * West Garden Grove, Garden Grove * Yorba Hills, Yorba Linda * Mesa Verde, Costa Mesa

Unincorporated communities These communities are outside of the city limits in unincorporated county territory: * Coto de Caza * El Modena * Ladera Ranch * Las Flores * Midway City * Orange Park Acres * Rossmoor * Silverado Canyon * Sunset Beach * Surfside * Trabuco Canyon * Tustin Foothills

Adjacent counties to Orange County Are: * Los Angeles County, California - north, west * San Bernardino County, California - northeast * Riverside County, California - east * San Diego County, California - southeast
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ORANGE COUNTY
ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY
Trusts, Wills, Probate and Estate Planning
..

Free Initial Consultation - House Calls Upon Request

ESTATE PLANNING ORANGE COUNTY, ORANGE COUNTY ESTATE PLANNING ATTORNEY, IRVINE ESTATE PLANNING,TRUST LITIGATION ATTORNEY, PROBATE LITIGATION ATTORNEY, Laguna Woods Estate Planning, Liesure World, Wills, Probate Lawyer, AB Trusts, ABC Trusts, Trust Funding, Life Insurance Trusts, Business Succession, Gifting, Elderly Care, Hospice, Home Care, Nursing Home, Advanced Health Care Directive, Probate, Living Trust, Conseritorship, Adult Day Care, Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Retirement Planning, Business and Tax Planning, Special Needs Trusts, Life Insurance Trusts, Retirement Trusts, Simple Trusts, Charitable Gifts, Generation Skipping Planning, Marital Agreements, International Estate Planning, Elder Law, Conservatorships, Guardianships, Real Estate Inheritance, Aliso Viejo, Costa Mesa, Dana Point, Huntington Beach, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Laguna Niguel, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Newport Beach, Orange, Placentia, Rancho Santa Margarita, San Clemente, San Juan Capistrano, Seal Beach, Tustin, Villa Park, Coto de Caza, Ladera Ranch

Disclaimer: The information and notices contained on this website are intended as general research and information and are expressly not intended, and should not be regarded, as financial or legal advice. We attempt to ensure that the material contained on the website is accurate and complete at the date first published, however you should recognize that information contained on this website may become out of date over time. Readers who have a particular question about estate planning, business succession, tax planning, probate, living trusts, probate litigation, trust litigation or who believe they require legal counsel, should seek the advise of an attorney

Tracy Murphy Attorney At Law, 9070 Irvine Center Drive, Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92618
Tel: (949)916-6020, Fax: (949)861-6520

"For Driving Directions Click Here"


Specializing in Trust and Probate Litigation, Trust / Probate Funding and Administration, Wills, Appointment of Guardianship for Children, Special Needs Planning, Incapacitation Planning, Advanced Health Care Directives


OUR CUSTOMERS COME FROM THE FOLLOWING CITIES FOR TRUSTS, WILLS, AND FINANCIAL PLANNING:

Aliso Viejo, 92653, 92656, 92698, Anaheim, 92801, 92802, 92803, 92804, 92805, 92806, 92807, 92808, 92809, 92812, 92814, 92815, 92816, 92817, 92825, 92850, 92899, Brea, 92821, 92822, 92823, Buena Park, 90620, 90621, 90622, 90623, 90624, Costa Mesa, 92626, 92627, 92628, Cypress, 90630, Dana Point, 92624, 92629, Fountain Valley, 92708, 92728, Fullerton, 92831, 92832, 92833, 92834, 92835, 92836, 92837, 92838, Garden Grove, 92840, 92841, 92842, 92843, 92844, 92845, 92846, Huntington Beach, 92605, 92615, 92646, 92647, 92648, 92649, Irvine, 92602, 92603, 92604, 92606, 92612, 92614, 92616, 92618, 92619, 92620, 92623, 92650, 92697, 92709, 92710, La Habra, 90631, 90632, 90633, La Palma, 90623, Laguna Beach, 92607, 92637, 92651, 92652, 92653, 92654, 92656, 92677, 92698, Laguna Hills, 92637, 92653, 92654, 92656, Laguna Niguel, 92607, 92677, Laguna Woods, 92653, 92654, Lake Forest, 92609, 92630, 92610, Los Alamitos, 90720, 90721, Mission Viejo, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92694, Newport Beach, 92657, 92658, 92659, 92660, 92661, 92662, 92663, Orange, 92856, 92857, 92859, 92861, 92862, 92863, 92864, 92865, 92866, 92867, 92868, 92869, Placentia, 92870, 92871, Rancho Santa Margarita, 92688, 92679, San Clemente, 92672, 92673, 92674, San Juan Capistrano, 92675, 92690, 92691, 92692, 92693, 92694, Santa Ana, 92701, 92702, 92703, 92704, 92705, 92706, 92707, 92708, 92711, 92712, 92725, 92728, 92735, 92799, Seal Beach, 90740, Stanton, 90680, Tustin, 92780, 92781, 92782, Villa Park, 92861, 92867, Westminster, 92683, 92684, 92685, Yorba Linda, 92885, 92886, 92887, Coto de Caza, El Modena, Ladera Ranch, Las Flores, Midway City, Orange Park Acres, Rossmoor, Silverado Canyon, Sunset Beach, Surfside, Trabuco Canyon, Tustin Foothills